Funneling Biomechanics into the Gym

Before embarking on this endeavor, we knew that we could not arbitrarily develop a set of scoring criteria for our fundamental motor skills without valid and reliable research to quantify our assessment.  Every skill in the AssessLinkPE program is based on the most historically validated peer-reviewed studies to ensure students are being evaluated accurately and responding to interventions appropriately.  We have taken highly detailed biomechanical studies and allowed the computer to calculate the necessary information needed for the educator to provide specifically tailored instruction to each student.  If we want students to excel and perform with a high level of physical competency, then our research needs be complete and thorough.  Read more about our process below.

research.papers.jpg

Exhaustive Research

Prior to launching the AssessLinkPE program, there was a research period of over 2 years to find the most relevant and widely accepted research of fundamental motor skills.  Our team has contacted and consulted with researchers at local universities, representatives from USA Basketball, USA Volleyball, USA Baseball and countless professionals to develop our scoring ranges.  This process will be forever ongoing as we strive to develop the most effective motor assessment tool ever created.

 Comprehensive analysis used to take hours

Comprehensive analysis used to take hours

from Hours to seconds

Some high school students took our data for each phase of the overhand throw and manually drew the joint angles and body segments.  The graphic above is what the students produced over the course of several hours.  The AssessLinkPE application can do this kind of analysis in seconds, saving the educator a massive amount of time without sacrificing accuracy and reliability.

 The Kicking Action (Lees & Nolan, 1998).

The Kicking Action (Lees & Nolan, 1998).

DETAIL without specialized training

For decades, kinesiologists have been pushing physical educators to get more detailed in their instruction and assessment.  The push back has been based on what is feasible when a teacher observes a student move and what level of detail they can see with their eye and remember for recording a score.  There is finally readily available and affordable technology that can produce this higher level of detail for the educator in a fast and effective way.